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Quotha

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May. 7th, 2012 | 7:51

Writing is like yoga.

It’s also like sex, cooking, parenthood, opera, war, gardening, and conjugating French verbs. But we’re going to go with the yoga analogy for now.

In my yoga class, my teacher tells me to think about my rib cage, my thigh muscles, my spine, my breath, my gaze, my ankles, my mouth, my cheeks, my hands, my balance, my toes, my belly, my kidneys, and The Universal. She also, at the same time, tells me to clear my mind and think of nothing. Then she tells me to stand on my left earlobe.

I’m sure the obvious parallels to writing are instantly apparent to you.

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Comments {7}

Persephone

(no subject)

from: persephone_kore
date: May. 7th, 2012 13:54 (UTC)
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Possibly I am being too literal, but I am inclined to suspect that writing is most like conjugating French verbs if you happen to be writing in French.

:)

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Tom Simon

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from: superversive
date: May. 7th, 2012 13:58 (UTC)
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From what I hear, it’s even more like conjugating French verbs if you’re writing in Russian. The Russian verb, like the Gorgon, is not a fit sight for the naked eye; it should be seen only in a bronze mirror, and approached with sword drawn and heroic butchery in mind.

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theFish

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from: thefish30
date: May. 8th, 2012 11:22 (UTC)
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Literal LOL!

Let me offer in return, what my brain serves up whenever the conversation 'approaches' Russian grammar, to wit:

Philip J. Davis defends (in The Thread) his rendering of "Voronovsky's Theorem" rather than "Voronovskaya's Theorem" by noting that his position is never to decline a Russian woman.

(It now occurs to me that this rather obvious pun may be an old chestnut to those familiar with the Russian bestiary, but it makes me happy.)

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arhyalon

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from: arhyalon
date: May. 7th, 2012 17:27 (UTC)
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I read Laura's book. I really enjoyed it!

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headnoises

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from: headnoises
date: May. 8th, 2012 5:17 (UTC)
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*heheh*

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(no subject)

from: friendofsophia.blogspot.com
date: May. 8th, 2012 21:08 (UTC)
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Ironically, my only contact with yoga is my sister's complaints about how uptight yoga classes are when there are capoeira classes next door. Capoeira's a Brazilian martial art that was disguised as a dance, and you ordinarily do it with music (at least when you're doing their equivalent of sparring). Apparently yoga instructors think any music more insistent than "one note on a sitar repeated ad infinitum" is legally actionable disturbance of the peace.

Aren't they supposed to be mellowing out? 'Cause the yoga doesn't seem to be helping.

Then again, yoga is a combination of circus acrobats' warmup exercises (yes really) with one medieval Hindu text on using exercise as a meditation, repackaged in the '60s as a way to part rich white hippies from their money. So...yeah.

Come to think of it, all of that—ironically uptight hippies, and the fact the whole thing is a fraud—is very reminiscent of a number of trends in writing, though not of writing itself.

Edited at 2012-05-08 09:09 pm (UTC)

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marycatelli

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from: marycatelli
date: May. 10th, 2012 12:26 (UTC)
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Aristotle observed long ago that an imaginative writer's one essential ability, and the only one that can not be learned, is the art of seeing resemblances.

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